Why You Need Home Insurance

Your home is likely your most valued asset. Even if you are renting, all your valuables are stored within your residence. Still, you may wonder why you actually need a Home insurance policy. Here are a few reasons why you need a home insurance policy.

Lenders Require Home Insurance

If you have a mortgage on your home, your lender will probably require you to have home insurance. This is to protect their investment as well as yours. Phil Klein Insurance Group can help homeowners in West Bloomfield, Michigan determine the homeowner’s coverage that is required by their lender.

Financial Protection

Homes can become damaged due to a myriad of things, from natural disasters to leaky roofs. These damages may well exceed what you can cover out of pocket, even if your home isn’t a total loss. Without homeowners insurance, you would be faced with getting a loan to repair or replace your home. Then there’s the cost of replacing your things, which most loans won’t cover.

Your Possessions are Valuable

If you are renting, you may not see a need for home insurance. However, your possessions are valuable too. Even if your home doesn’t contain priceless valuables, it would require a good deal of money to replace your possessions. Most of us accumulate possessions throughout our lives and don’t really consider how expensive it would be to purchase everything we need for our home at one time.

Protection From Liability

In many cases, if someone is hurt or injured on your property, they can hold you responsible for their medical bills. In some cases, you may be responsible for lost wages or damages as well. Homeowners insurance can protect you from these risks, and pay associated costs in the case of an incident.

Phil Klein Insurance Group is an independent insurance agency in West Bloomfield, MI. This allows us to find the right home policy for your needs.

 

How To Know When You’re Ready to Retire

Many workers look forward to retirement and the new changes and opportunities it brings; but, some might struggle to determine when they are ready to retire. There’s no exact science or magic number to determine the right time to retire. Instead, attention to retirement savings and creating a plan for what to do during retirement may help you better understand when you are both financially and emotionally ready for retirement.

Financial Retirement Readiness
According to a 2018 study of over 2,000 working Americans ages 40-70, about one-fifth of respondents were financially unprepared for retirement.(1)  While many retirees rely on Social Security benefits to help fill savings gaps, currently, Social Security benefits only cover approximately 40 percent of an average worker’s pre-retirement income.(2)  In addition to personal savings and Social Security benefits, other sources to supplement retirement income include individual retirement arrangements (IRAs), employer-sponsored retirement plans (401(k) plans, pensions, profit sharing plans, etc.) and fixed indexed annuities.

Everyone has different financial needs in retirement. When considering whether you are ready to retire, evaluate your financial strength to see if you are in a position to stop working. A retirement calculator can help you establish a retirement savings goal by comparing your income and current savings with your age and anticipated expenses. Various retirement calculators are available online, free of charge.

An additional way to help gauge financial readiness is to examine how retirement costs will affect your nest egg. Some retirement costs to consider may include:

*Healthcare
*Housing
*Debt
*Extra expenses, such as traveling
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics data, older households typically spend an average of $49,279 a year on living expenses, including food, housing, clothing, transportation, healthcare and entertainment.(3)  Having a plan in place for how to pay for expenses may help you feel more confident in your decision to retire.

Emotional Retirement Readiness
While meeting financial goals is an important part of retirement planning, an often forgotten aspect is emotional readiness. For many, working provides a sense of validation, in addition to other psychological benefits, such as a daily structure and social interaction. Because of that, retiring may present a sense of loss for some and be a risk for depression.(4)  Retirement is a major change, with emotional implications, that shouldn’t be done on a whim. Consider creating a list of your goals for retirement. Do you want to travel? Spend more time with your grandkids? Start a new hobby? Work part time? Move to a new city? After you’ve established your goals, create a plan to achieve those goals.

Here are some other ways to better prepare for the emotional side of retiring:

*Create a plan for how you will spend your days in retirement
*Establish a retirement bucket list
*Find or create an emotional support system of friends and family
*Pursue a new hobby or consider a part-time job as a bridge from working to full retirement(4)
Deciding when to retire can be a complex decision with many factors contributing to retirement readiness. Ultimately, the only person who truly knows when you are ready to retire is you. Paying attention to both financial and emotional milestones and defining retirement goals can all help you in making the decision to retire.

If you need professional guidance or have questions, please call us today at (248) 682-7445 or email owen@philkleininsurance.com

Footnotes
Footnote 1 Indexed Annuity Leadership Council, “The State of America’s Workforce: The Reality of Retirement Readiness” 2018↩
Footnote 2 Social Security Administration, “Learn About Social Security Programs” ↩
Footnote 3 Bureau of Labor and Statistics, “A Closer Look at Spending Patterns of Older Americans” 2016↩
Footnote 4 US News and World Report, “Can Retirement Be a Depression Risk?” 2017